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Macworld The first iOS 17 Developer Beta was released on the first day of WWDC, as is tradition. While it is meant for developers to begin building apps using new frameworks and APIs, and to test and send bug reports if their apps don’t work with the new software, it is technically available to anyone with a developer account. In fact, the Developer Beta used to require a paid membership to the developer program, which costs $99 a year. With iOS 17, Apple changed its policy to allow even those with free developer accounts (which otherwise only provide access to the developer forums and Xcode) to download the iOS 17 Developer Beta. Still, we recommend waiting for the Public Beta…
Macworld If you don’t want to wait to install the next version of macOS – which we now know will be called Sonoma after Apple revealed all the details at WWDC in June, you can join the beta program and try it out on your Mac before it is released to the public in September or October. The developer beta of macOS 14 Sonoma is already available to download. This year the developer beta isn’t just available to developers who have paid to join Apple’s Developer Program (which costs $99/£79), Apple has opened it up to anyone who is a registered developer. We explain how to get a free developer account below. The slightly more stable public beta version will…
Macworld If you don’t want to wait to install the next version of macOS – which we now know will be called Sonoma after Apple revealed all the details at WWDC in June, you can join the beta program and try it out on your Mac before it is released to the public in September or October. The developer beta of macOS 14 Sonoma is already available to download. This year the developer beta isn’t just available to developers who have paid to join Apple’s Developer Program (which costs $99/£79), Apple has opened it up to anyone who is a registered developer. We explain how to get a free developer account below. The slightly more stable public beta version will…
Macworld Apple began the beta testing process for iOS 16.6 just a day after the iOS 16.5 release and about two weeks before the expected first iOS 17 developer beta arrives at WWDC. The beta was first released to developers first on May 19, and to public beta testers on May 22. We don’t expect there to be much in the way of new features in this release–iOS 16 is about as mature as it’s going to be, and all eyes are on the impending features announced for iOS 17. Still, small tweaks and usability upgrades are possible just as we got in iOS 16.5, and of course security updates are never-ending. Most of us have moved on to iOS…
Macworld Update 6/27/23: Apple has released the developer beta 4 of macOS Ventura 13.5. The public beta 4 will follow later this week. Apple on Tuesday released the macOS Ventura 13.5 beta 4 to developers. The release notes are as follows: Startup Security Utility Known Issues Startup Security Utility in macOS Recovery may not accept an administrator password after updating. This affects Intel Macs with the Apple T2 Security Chip that have the secure boot policy set to “No Security”. To work around this, boot to macOS Recovery and run the resetpassword command from Terminal. Once the password is changed, you can authenticate with the new password in Startup Security Utility. (109932528) SwiftUI Resolved Issues Fixed an issue where NSHostingView would not appear when…
Macworld The beta of iOS 17 has arrived and beta testers have raced to install it on their iPhones. Testing the beta of iOS 17 does give you a glimpse of what is to come later this year when the final version of iOS 17 arrives, but installing a beta can have more risks than benefits, especially early on in the beta testing process. If the buggy pre-release iOS 17 becomes more trouble than it is worth here’s how to remove it. Step 1: Wipe your iPhone If you want to remove the beta from your device in theory it should be a case of recovering a backup from before you installed the beta. However, when a beta is installed…
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